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365 Days of Wonderful

January 20 & 21, 2018

RBC Convention Centre Winnipeg

Blog

Wedding Etiquette

Posted by in Wedding Resources

A few general quidelines to some of the basics. Just remember each wedding is different, but the following information is a good place to get started.

 

Receiving Lines:

Receiving lines serve many different purposes. First of all they allow each guest the opportunity to see the bride and groom and offer their best wishes and congratulations. Secondly it is an opportunity for introductions.

Traditionally receiving lines are comprised of the parents of the bride and groom, the bride and groom, the maid of honour and the bridesmaids.

As each guest passes through the line they should be introduced to those in the receiving line with whom they are not acquainted by the person standing adjacent to them.

Flower girls, ring bearers, and ushers are not part of the formal receiving line, but can mingle with the guests.

In the case of divorced parents organize the receiving line such that divorced parents do not have to stand next to each other.

Receiving Line Order

Mother of the Bride
Father of the Bride (optional)
Mother of the Groom
Father of the Groom (optional)
Bride
Groom
Maid of Honour
Best Man
Bridesmaid(s)
Usher(s)

 

Seating Arrangements:

Seating arrangements at the church may very depending on the religion and clergy. If you have any questions or concerns about seating arrangements you should address your clergy.

Typically the bride’s family and friends sit on the left hand side and the groom’s on the right. Parents are seated in the first pew, followed by other important guests. Often these pews are differentiated from the rest with special pew markers/bows. Sometimes general guests are seated evenly on both sides, if there is a strong imbalance.

Seating at the Church

Bride’s Parents
Bride’s Grandparents, siblings, aunts, uncles, godparents, etc.
Other family & friends of the bride

Groom’s Parents
Groom’s Grandparents, siblings, aunts, uncles, godparents, etc.
Other family & friends of the groom

If your church has two aisles the bride’s family and friends are usually seated on both sides of the left aisle and the grooms on the right. Parents and special guests usually sit next to the appropriate aisle, but in the center section.If the parents of the bride or groom are divorced they are seated in separate pews. For example the mother in the first and father in the second. Alternatively there may be a few rows of family member seated in-between if extra “space” is required. (Each situation is unique and may require some creativity and compromise to find the “right” solution for you.)

Seating at the Head Table

Bridesmaid
Usher
Bridesmaid
Best Man
Bride
Groom
Maid of Honour
Usher
Bridesmaid
Usher

Each set of parents are usually seated at their own table with family, (close friends) and clergy.

 

Toasts:

There are many acceptable variations on the order of toasts and their presentation, however they usually follow this traditional guideline.

Order of Toasts

Toast to the Bride
Toast to the Bride and Groom
The Groom’s Response followed by the toast to the bridesmaids.
The Best Man’s Response on behalf of the bridesmaids.
Other Toasts
Toast by the Father of the Bride welcoming the groom to the family and inviting guests to enjoy their evening.

Something Old, Something New…

Posted by in Wedding Resources

Did you ever wonder how the quote “Something Old, Something New, Something Borrowed, Something Blue” started?

Something Old:

This refers to the brides previous way of living, before the wedding. It is suppose to symbolize the transition into her new life, whilst not forgetting the one she had.

Something New:

This is the second part of the transition. It signifies the future ahead and all the prosperity it shall bring.

Something Borrowed:

This item tends to be borrowed from another previously wed bride. You borrow it so that you may have all the luck and joy that the bride who first wore it has now in her marriage.

Something Blue:

Before Queen Victoria set the standard for marrying in white, Blue was the common colour to be wed in. Blue, much before white (in fact during biblical times) was the colour of purity, and thus, women would marry gowned in it. The artifact of blue is merely a testament to the original colour of purity.